The history
of Piazza
Venezia

The current appearance of the area of Piazza Venezia results from the reconfiguration work carried out between the late nineteenth and early twentieth century with the construction of the monument to Victor Emmanuel II. The buildings that faced the south side of the square – with the exception of the fifteenth-century Palazzo Venezia – were then demolished, and the palace of the Assicurazioni Generali was built.

The hallway of the museum gathers photographic, artistic and documentary evidence that tells the story of the area between Trajan's Forum and the Capitol, going back in time and reconstructing its evolution since ancient Rome.

May 2012

Palazzo of Assicurazioni Generali in Piazza Venezia

Mauro Mezzarobba

May 2012

1931

Master Plan

1931

February 17, 1907

“The Italian illustration”

year 34, Issue No. 7 of 17 February 1907
Central State Archive

February 17, 1907

August 12, 1904

The Construction Site overlooking Piazza Venezia

Central State Archive

August 12, 1904

May 13, 1903

Demolition of the Palazzo della Catena, corner of Via Nazionale

Central State Archive

May 13, 1903

May 6, 1897

Project for the reconfiguration of Piazza Venezia and its surroundings

Giuseppe Sacconi
Central State Archive

May 6, 1897

1890

Aerial view of Piazza Venezia

Anonymous photographer
Martin G. Conde collection

1890

1883

Extract of the 1883 master plan: area of Piazza Venezia and surroundings of the Monument to Victor Emmanuel II

Central State Archive

1883

1870-1890

Palazzo Torlonia in Piazza Venezia

Albumen print
1870 to 1890
Museum of Rome

1870-1890

1839

Piazza Venezia with the Palazzo and Palazzetto Venezia and Palazzo Torlonia on the left

Etchning
Luigi Rossini
Museum of Rome

1839

1835-1840

Piazza Venezia with the Palazzo and Palazzetto Venezia

Pen and ink-watercolour
Giovanni Riveruzzi
Museum of Rome

1835-1840

1835

Geometric elevation drawing of construction sites in Rome

Alessandro Moschetti
Museum of Rome

1835

1786

Piazza Venezia with the Palazzo Venezia on the right, the Palazzetto Venezia and Palazzo Torlonia on the left

Etchning
Giuseppe Vasi
Museum of Rome

1786

1748

The central area of Rome with the Piazza and Palazzo Venezia

Etchning
Giovan Battista Nolli
New Topography of Rome, pl. 5. Historical
Capitoline Archives

1748

1676

Detail of Piazza San Marco (Piazza Venezia) and the Aracoeli Basilica

Etchning
Giovan Battista Falda
Nes Map et elevation of the city of Rome.
library of Archaelogy and History of Art, Rome

1676

1593

Piazza Venezia with the Palace and the house opposite

Etchning
Antonio Tempesta
Map of Rome (re-release of Giovanni Giaomo dè Rossi in 1693). Sarti Library.

1593

1551

Rear of Palazzo Venezia (Pall. S.Marco) and the block opposite, occupied by private residences

Colour pen drawing
Leonardo Bufalini
Reconstruction by Giuseppe Fiorelli in 1879.
Historical Capitoline Archives

1551

1320

Map of Rome in the fourteenth century

Pen drawing
Frà Paolino of Venezia
A.P. Frutaz, Maps of Roma (1962)

1320

1907

Map of Rome in the eighth century bu the so-called “Anonymous of Einsiedeln

Chromolitograph
Reconstruction by Christian Huelsen in 1907
Historical Capitoline Archives

1907

1959

Marble Map of Ancient Rome (Forma Urbis marmorea)

203-211 d. C.
Reconstruction by Guglielmo Gatti, 1959
The marble map of ancient Rome.
Forma Urbis Romae, edited by G. Carettoni, A. M. Colini, L. Cozza, G, Gatti, 1960, tables 62 A and B

Gigantic marble map of the city of Rome, which consists of 150 slabs covering an area of 18.22 by 12.87 metres with reproductions of the buildings of the city in 1:240 scale. Engraved under the reign of Septimius Severus between 203 and 211 AD, it was affixed on a wall of the Temple of Peace. Altought it reached us in a fragmentary state (1,186 plate fragments), the map is the main ancient document for studying imperial Rome topography.
1959

1893

Archaeological map of ancient Rome, detail of the area of the Trajan Forum and the Capitol



Rodolfo Lanciani.
Foma Urbis Romae, 1983-1901 

1893

Marble Map of Ancient Rome (Forma Urbis marmorea)

Fragments of the plates with the Basilica Ulpia (City Antiquarium, Rome) show inside the reconstruction of the Trajan Forum sector.

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